Events

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“The South Side: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation” a Presentation by Natalie Y. Moore, Thursday, January 12, 2017, 7pm.

“Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad,” a Presentation by Jeanine Michna-Bales, Thursday, February 23, 2017, 7pm.

“Untold Stories: Enslaved People in the Home of the Grimke Family,” a Presentation by Louise W. Knight, Thursday, March 2, 2017, 7pm.


EHC’s 11th Annual Holiday Food Drive

Sunday, December 4, and also from Thursday, December 8 through Saturday, December 10 from 1 – 4 p.m. each day.
at the Evanston History Center,
225 Greenwood Street, Evanston

In partnership with the Greater Chicago Food Depository, the EHC kicks off the 11th annual holiday food drive! Please consider donating to this important cause. All food collected will go directly to an Evanston food pantry to benefit area residents. Donations of nutritious, non-perishable food (no glass, please) will be accepted at the Dawes House, 225 Greenwood St., on Sunday, December 4 from 1-4 p.m., and also from Thursday, December 8 through Saturday, December 10 from 1-4 p.m. each day.


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Click the image to view more information on the Winter UTB!

January UTB Lecture:
Natalie Moores Talk, Winter 2016“The South Side: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation” with Natalie Y. Moore
Thursday, January 12, 2017, 7pm.

Reception catered by Whole Foods Market starts at 6:30pm

Join us for a presentation by Chicago native and WBEZ reporter Natalie Y. Moore, author of The South Side: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation (2016). Moore will discuss the history of the city’s patterns and policies of segregation, as well as their contemporary manifestations. Moore, who grew up on the South Side and continues to live there, injects her narrative with clarity and focus as she provides an insightful portrait of the real impact of segregation on communities and individuals within a city that is identified both as “world class” and as deeply divided by race. Through her work to document and delve into Chicago’s long-term history of segregation, Moore offers an insightful and deeply human look at the roots and continued impact of segregation in one of America’s most important and representative cities. A book signing will follow the presentation.
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Make a reservation here

February UTB Lecture:
Jeanine Michna-Bales Talk, Winter 2016“Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad” with Jeanine Michna-Bales
Thursday, February 23, 2017, 7pm.

Reception catered by Whole Foods Market starts at 6:30pm

Photographer Jeanine Michna-Bales spent more than a decade researching the way enslaved people escaped to freedom and the pathways and safe houses they used along the routes that guided freedom seekers north. Through her project, she produced a series of haunting and moving photographs made along a distance that extended from the cotton plantations of central Louisiana, through the cypress swamps of Mississippi and the plains of Indiana, north to Canada— a path of nearly fourteen hundred miles. Her images comprise both a traveling exhibit (on view at EHC and the Evanston Arts Center January 28 – March 16, 2017) and a companion book, Through Darkness to Light (2017). Join us for a presentation by Michna-Bales as she discusses her work, the meanings captured by her images, and the ways in which she uses photography as a tool for education and dialogue. A book signing will follow the presentation. Presented in partnership with the Lombard Historical Society.
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Make a reservation here

March UTB Lecture:
“Untold Stories: Enslaved People in the Home of the Grimke Family” with Louise W. Knight, Thursday, March 2, 2017, 7pm.

Reception catered by Whole Foods Market starts at 6:30pm

When we think about how enslaved people responded to their bondage, we often think first of those who liberated themselves through the underground railroad, but this is only part of the story. Join us for a presentation by historian Louise W. Knight as she discusses some of the other ways people rebelled against enslavement, drawing on the stories of the enslaved people of the aristocratic Grimke family of Charleston, South Carolina. Pieced together from correspondence, white owners’ published recollections, and “runaway” ads in newspapers, the stories illustrate the courage and resourcefulness with which people met their involuntary bondage.
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This Women’s History Month program is co-sponsored with the Evanston Women’s History Project.
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Make a reservation here

EHC Gratefully Acknowledges the Generous Support of Our Partners and Sponsors:
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